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October 23, 2015

If local governments in Europe were to choose which low-carbon technologies to implement, what could be their main criteria for evaluation? What would be the priorities of European local governments for low-carbon energy technologies based on their population size and geographical region? Is there a relationship between local governments’ priorities and their gross domestic product (GPD) per capita?  These are the questions that we tried to examine in our research paper published this month in Energies.

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October 23, 2015

Abstract: The main objective of this article is to assess the priorities of local governments (LGs) in Europe regarding climate change mitigation technologies evaluation in the electricity sector and to provide important insights for energy policy design. The study applies a hybrid weighting methodology to elicit LGs’ preferences in a constructive and iterative way regarding the evaluation criteria of low-carbon energy technologies. Furthermore, the study employs three data collection and preference elicitation methods, namely: survey, workshop, and webinar.

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December 10, 2013

Introduction: Water is an important source for living. It is expected that due to interplay of climate change, population growth and industrialization, fresh water will become one of the scarcest resources for humans, societies, and ecosystems. In several areas of the world, for example, the state of California in the US and southern parts of Australia, this is already visible. Water shortage affects not only social human conditions, but also has an economic impact, for example in the agricultural domain. Water has social, economic, and environmental aspects.

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December 7, 2013

Abstract: Dhaka is one of the largest megacities in the world and its population is growing rapidly. Due to its location on a deltaic plain, the city is extremely prone to detrimental flooding, and risks associated with this are expected to increase further in the coming years due to global climate change impacts as well as the high rate of urbanization the city is facing. The lowest-lying part of Dhaka, namely Dhaka East, is facing the most severe risk of flooding. Traditionally, excess water in this part of the city was efficiently stored in water ponds and gradually drained into rivers through connected canals.

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